A separate set of accounts, in a different book, show:

'The Accounts of Mr Nathaniel King and Mr George Sharkey, churchwardens for the year. It is interesting to see what was spent.

Paid Coleman's man for a polecat
[This was still wild country, with polecats about].
Paid 12 poor sailors upon their travels.
[Presumably they had been discharged after the wars and were making their way home].
 

1 shilling

2 shilling


Paid for a proclamation and prayer book
Bread and wine for Whitsuntide
Mending of bell wheel
Bread and wine
Another polecat
Bread and wine for Michaelmas
Paid for 45 dozen of bread
cheese
a 'barrill' of ale
Bread and wine for Christmas
Another polecat
Bread and wine for Easter
Polecat
Paid for putting up the bell for work
and stuff
Paid for brooms, washing the church
linen and dressing the church at
Christmas and Easter
Paid for three funerals






£2
£1
£1


£10



£7


2s
5s
6d
5s
1s
5s
5s
14s
2s
5s
1s
4s
1s
10s

9s


4s
0d
0d
6d
1d
0d
1d
0d
9d
6d
2d
0d
0d
0d
0d

0d


6d

Unfortunately the 1714 accounts are missing [folio 81]. The 1715 accounts [folio 82] show that they are still paying for polecats (four in the year) 5s 6d for a new bell rope and £1 5s 0d for a new bell wheel and hanging the bell, but there is no mention of the Almshouse, or building materials.

pic11
Polecat, from Quadrupeds, by Bewick

The Polecat, Proto Tebbitus
.
A larger and even fiercer relation of the weasel, which was a menace
in any chicken run. Now extinct except in some remote regions of
Scotland and, reputedly, in the House of Lords (Michael Foot in the House of Commons compared Norman Tebbit, who was a violent debater, to ’an untrained polecat.’)

From a reference to Thomas as the vicar, we know that a church was in existence on Paddington Green in 1324, but there may have been earlier ones. This building was demolished in 1678, after a new one had been erected in 1675. Hogarth married Jane Thornhill in this building in 1729.

In 1788 an Act of Parliament for a new church was passed as the old one was too small. This was demolished in 1788 and the present St. Mary's Church was opened in 1791, at a cost more than £6,200. Progress in collecting this sum was slow, but achieved in the end. Mrs Siddons was buried in the churchyard in 1831.

 

 

Page 10
Page 12
Updated June 8, 2012