The Building of Queen's Park

The rush to get away from the centre of London in the Eighteen Sixties was intense. Builders became active along the train lines in Kilburn, Stoke Newington, Kilburn and elsewhere. The London commuter was born. Today the houses of Queen’s Park are noticeably different from others surrounding them. They are small terraces of houses in wide streets, with polychromatic brick detailing unlike anywhere else nearby, but to be found in other isolated estates in other parts of London and the provinces. The story is quite unusual.

++PUT THE EARLIER QUEENsPARK SECTION HERE,

The Milne Map of 1800, shows an area on either side of the Harrow Road labeled 'To Chelsea Parish'. Although it was some miles from Chelsea and surrounded by Willesden, Paddington, and Kensington, it was administered by Chelsea and known as 'Chelsea Removed'.  On the Tithe Award Map of 1847 Queens Park consists of fields 62-68 and, by pure chance, the same page of the Tithe Award Schedule includes the Chelsea Physic Garden and Ranelagh, two of the best known of all Chelsea amenities and both well within the borough of Chelsea proper, yet this area is miles away. It had been left to Chelsea centuries earlier and administered by that borough at arms length. Lots of similar ‘detached’ areas existed in London until 1900, when there was a general tidying up.

THE TITHE MAP AND SCHEDULE OF CHELSEA  REMOVED

The Schedule shows Owners, Occupiers, Fields and Acreages


The Chelsea Tithe Award Schedule of the area, 1847

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Page 80

Updated October 25, 2011